Six Success Secrets For Women This International Women’s Day

For International Women’s Day, we had the incredible opportunity of being inspired by two women who ooze success: Jackie Brian, acting Managing Director of Intuit and our very own Managing Partner, EJ Granleese. Both have paved their own path to accomplished careers and we were lucky enough to find out their top tips to succeed in an industry where 70% of leaders are male.

1. Be hungry for knowledge, listen and learn

Workplace Gender Equality Agency has shown that 90.1% of women aged between 20 and 24 have achieved year 12 qualifications or higher, compared to only 86% of men1. The thirst for knowledge is there – keep pushing yourself outside your comfort zone by volunteering for projects, shadow industry leaders and attend career development workshops.

2. Don't take no for an answer

It’s not a ‘no’, more a slight speed bump and new challenge to tackle. A great example EJ used was her ability to turn a ‘no’ into a ‘wait and see what I can do’. In one instance, this resulted in her becoming the youngest and only female MD of her company in the Asia Pacific region.

3. Utilise connections

Connections and building relationships are key from the beginning of your career and throughout your growth. To strengthen and established contacts, utilise LinkedIn and make the effort to catch up in person, taking an interest in peoples’ lives outside of work.

4. Never apologise and take pride in your differences

If you’re a female in a chair position, only 14.2% of the seats next to you are also filled by women2. Leverage your differences and use your uniqueness to stand out. When working in Korea, Jackie highlighted that instead of apologising for her foreignness, embracing her differences allowed her to complete her role more efficiently.

5. Know your intention

In any job, role or situation, identify what you want to achieve. For a role within a new company, your intention may be to become an expert of a certain field, or if you a promoted within your current organisation, your intention may be to educate your peers.

6. Set goals

Whether it’s for 5 months, 12 months or 5 years’ time, have clear goals of what you want to achieve and map out how you will get there. Continually go back, review and edit – the path may have changed or the timeline altered, but it’s important you remain focused.

With the gender wage gap slightly decreasing year-on-year to sit at 24%2 in 2015, we all must be striving to achieve equality.

SOURCES

1.     Intern Bridge, ‘The Debate over unpaid college internships’ http://www.ceri.msu.edu/wpcontent/uploads/2015/01/Intern-Bridge-Unpaid-College-Internship-Report-FINAL.pdf.

  1. WGEA (2015), Australia’s gender equality scorecard, https://www.wgea.gov.au/sites/default/files/2014-15-WGEA_SCORECARD.pdf




Posted on March 9, 2016 .